Companies

Kindle – Firing up a revolution


Transforming an industry that has been incrementally improving on a business model and technology for over 500 years is not for the faint of heart. Although it might still be too early to compare the impact of ebooks to that of the mechanical printing press (invented by Gutenberg in 1440), the Amazon Kindle seems up to the task.

I ordered my 2nd generation Kindle as soon as it was released in early 2009 (yup, I paid the premium) and it has fundamentally changed how I read. I read a lot more now than I used to, I never lose my page, I always have a dictionary at hand, I can carry a whole slew of books on every vacation, I beam with pride (at least I used to, back in 2009) when people ask to take a closer look and I try to sell a Kindle to everyone who cares to listen. Yup, you guessed it… the Amazon Kindle far exceeds my buy, use, love threshold.

Read More Books by Brother O'Mara

It was pretty obvious to me that there are some key lessons in the Kindle saga for Product Managers like me. And, I’m glad to report that I was not disappointed… here’s what I found.

Going the distance matters more than being first out of the gate
With all the profiles that I’ve written, it’s become clear that creating great products and services is a marathon, not a sprint. It doesn’t really matter who gets out of the gate first; the winners are prepared to go the distance and this is truly the case for the Kindle. The Sony Reader hit the shelves at Borders in 2006, well before the first Kindle was released. However, today the Kindle leads the ebook market because Amazon optimized the whole customer experience. Amazon went beyond the device and obsessed about the size of the catalog, the buying experience, the ability to share content across different devices, etc. All good Product Managers want to take the long view, but we all know that short term pressures are real and endless. When in doubt, redouble your focus on the entire customer experience and barter speed for stamina.

Identify and beat the real competition
Regardless of all the iPad talk, the primary competition for ebooks today is… you guessed it… good old paper (this will likely change in the future with greater adoption of ebooks). And, today the Kindle does an exceptional job of matching or beating a paper book when it comes to the buying, carrying and reading experience (and lately they’ve been working on the sharing bit as well). As Jeff Bezos put it during an interview with Charlie Rose, “You think Hemingway is going to pop more in color?” Understanding the target market and customer behavior well enough to accurately identify the real competition is key for all Product Managers. No amount of competitive feature/functionality wins can make up for confusion about the target market and customer needs.

Sometimes innovation demands brand new skills
It’s pretty normal to think… “but, Amazon is an e-commerce company not a hardware company.” The Kindle is a great example of a company seeking to understand their customers’ needs and then learning new skills to meet those needs. Amazon started up a subsidiary called Lab126 to build the hardware expertise it needed and based the group in the best place on earth to find the talent, Apple country – Cupertino, CA. For businesses and Product Managers, it’s pretty easy to pigeonhole oneself and one’s product into a well-defined category. However, innovation often happens at the fringes of existing domains. If success lies in creating a new domain or radically redefining an existing one, then obviously being a customer and market expert (by being humble and observant) is more critical than being a domain expert.

The ebook market is relatively new and very dynamic so it is likely that, a couple of years from now, I’ll look back at this post and wonder what I was thinking. For now, I love my Kindle and the more I read on it, the more I am inspired to listen to my customers, push the accepted boundaries and focus on the entire customer experience.

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